And I am now busily working away at them, but meanwhile a cover also arrived:

It weighs in at a shade under 370 pages – big Brill pages too, which are a shit to proof. Publication is listed for end of October. The Table of Contents is as follows (collection of pictures back here):

Introduction

Chapter 1. The Superstitions of Max Horkheimer

Chapter 2: The Dissent of E.P. Thompson

Chapter 3: The Zeal of G.E.M. de Ste. Croix

Chapter 4: The Alchemy of Michael Löwy

Chapter 5. The Myths of Roland Barthes

Chapter 6: The Flights of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari

Chapter 7: The Radical Homiletics of Antonio Negri

Conclusion

Now, being a hardcover and Brill book, it ain’t cheap (lovely paradox, of course), as you will find at the Brill website or Amazon.

But you can order it for your library, toss away your inheritage, sell an ovary or testicle, ask a Chinese friend to copy it for you, or simply copy it yourself … until the paperback comes out from those reputable lefties at Haymarket Books. First I have to get the proofs done.

NB: Criticism of Theology is volume three of the Criticism of Heaven and Earth series.

Criticism of Theology, volume three of the Criticism series, will be published by Brill in October. Pre-order for your libraries and squeeze that wealthy aunt for a Christmas present (or ask a friend in China to reproduce it for less than a euro).

Brill has started production on Criticism of Theology, volume 3 of the Criticism series. It should be out in 3-4 months. TOC:

Chapter 1. The Superstitions of Max Horkheimer

(my new glasses look like that …)

Chapter 2: The Dissent of E.P. Thompson

Chapter 3: The Zeal of G.E.M. de Ste. Croix

(OK, couldn’t find a picture of Geoffrey Earnest Maurice, but this’ll do)

Chapter 4: The Alchemy of Michael Löwy

(what is in that bottle, dopey?)

Chapter 5. The Myths of Roland Barthes

(one-time lover of cigars and Foucault)

Chapter 6: The Flights of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari

(Felix is keen, isn’t he?)

Chapter 7: The Radical Homiletics of Antonio Negri

The joys of writing: Criticism of Earth is due to go to the printers, but the editors want me to change all my citations of the 1040 items by Marx and Engels (many of those works are cited on multiple occasions) to a different system. To get a sense of this, Marx wrote non-stop for about 50 years and Engels for almost 60. In some years the references run up to 15-20 items. And they all need to be changed … by hand. Now, where is the beer and where are those smokes?

NB: both Criticism of Theology and Criticism of Earth will be out this year.

Shit that feels good: I have just sent the fully revised ms for Criticism of Theology: On Marxism and Theology III to press (which should weigh in at about 400 pp). It already feels like a holiday.

I’ve just finished a complete revision of my chapter – the last – in Criticism of Theology. It’s on the indefatigable Tony Negri, from whom I have gathered some choice morsels:

‘What a sublime and, at the same time, sordid vocation this theological discipline has’.

Now, the relation the Left has stabilised with religion consists in continuously winking on the sly at superstition’.

‘The problem of salvation is all the more important for those who have been Marxists’.

‘In general, the biblical texts have always been extremely important for me.’

‘Religion is a big rip-off in itself, but it can also be a great instrument of liberation’.

‘Even the old God of Genesis, not at all inclined to benevolence, was satisfied with his work’.