We – Sean Durbin and I – are putting the final touches to a new book series with Palgrave Macmillan. It is called ‘Religion and Radicalism’ and will publish monographs and edited volumes. But what does religion and radicalism mean in this case?

This series arises from the international Religion and Radicalism project. It is primarily interested in left-wing religious radicalism and the way it relates to progressive politics. This under-explored tradition has two main dimensions: a) profound criticism of an oppressive status quo in light of religious alterity (claims to a higher reality), which entails often revolutionary means for overcoming that situation; b) alternative forms of social life that value justice, equality, and collective endeavour.

Religion has been inextricably part of radical political movements since such movements began. The Peasant Revolution led by Thomas Müntzer in 16th century Germany, the Taiping Rebellion in 19th century China, and Liberation Theology in the 20th century are only the most well-known of a myriad of such movements. However, in recent years scholarly inquiry has tended to focus squarely on reactionary religious movements, their political consequences, and their threats to the status quo. Relatively little attention has been given to radical left-wing movements. This series directly addresses that lack in research and assessment.

The volumes respond to a growing thirst for critical knowledge of the religious heritage of radical movements. Members of radical movements seek to draw insights from this heritage; progressive political philosophers have begun to engage in detail with various religious traditions; many are inspired to become involved in such movements due to religious inspiration. The time is ripe for a comprehensive and sustained engagement with that rich radical tradition in its many dimensions.

Five volumes are ready to be published, but we are – obviously – interested in further volumes, especially monographs. So, if you have a book in mind or in hand, contact us and we can discuss a proposal.

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