While you were looking elsewhere … China now builds the best bridges in the world

While you may have been distracted by the way ‘Western’ countries (that is, a small group of former colonisers) are tearing themselves apart, China has quietly become a world leader in another area: bridge building.

You may know that the best and most advanced mobile phones are designed and contructed here (Huawei Mate 30), or that China is now the leading innovator and constructor of high-speed rail in more and more places throughout the world, or that China leads the world in re-afforestation and consistently wins awards for environmental protection, or that it offers a more stable model of governance, or that … the list could go on and on and it increases at a stunning rate.

But bridges? Given that most of China is quite mountainous, bridges are an absolute must (as are tunnels). And since a crucial feature of the poverty alleviation program, let alone the Belt and Road Initiative, is the construction of rail and road, bridges cannot be avoided. The outcome is that China is now the world leader in bridge technology and construction.

For example, China has recently constructed the world’s longest sea bridge in Fujian province connecting five islands and the mainland.

It will not be long before the island of Taiwan is connected with the mainland by such a bridge.

At the same time, the country’s bridge building is winning international awards. The showcase is Beipanjiang Bridge, on the border between the mountainous Guizhou and Yunnan provinces. More than half a kilometre above the gorge it spans, it required significant innovation to deal with complicated geographical conditions. It won the Gustav Lindenthal Medal in 2018 and the special merit award by the International Federation of Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) in 2019. Not a bad result in a country that in 1978 was one of the poorest in the world, with more than 95 percent below the poverty line. Not any more.

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