The China Road conference now has over 100 papers, of which more than 40 will be presented by leading Chinese scholars. The conference will take place on 13-15 August, 2016.

Please note: the early bird registration is now extended to 15 June. The registration of AUD $180 includes lunches and morning and afternoon teas, and assists in defraying some of the costs of venue hire and simultaneous Chinese-English translation.

For more information, see the webpage.

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

CALL FOR PAPERS: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 15 MAY

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The China Road conference is sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the University of Newcastle, Australia.

When 13 to 15 August 2016

Where Noah’s on the Beach Hotel, Cnr Shortland Esplanade & Zaara Street, Newcastle, NSW, Australia

Contact chinaroad2016@newcastle.edu.au

Panel and paper proposal deadline 15 May 2016

We invite paper and panel proposals for the first China Road international conference in the Southern Hemisphere.

The China Road has a number of levels of meaning. It concerns China’s distinct path in the modern world, a path that has also been called the ‘Beijing Consensus’ and ‘socialism with Chinese characteristics’, with deep historical roots and a broad basis in reality. It also refers to the new ‘Belt and Road Initiative’, which seeks to revitalise countries along and around the old Silk Road – a revitalisation that includes economic, cultural, social and educational dimensions. These levels of meaning continue to generate significant debate and discussion: is China’s path distinct? If so, what are the features of this path? What role does China’s distant and recent history play in such a path?

In this light, the conference will examine the China Road from a range of perspectives. These include philosophy, Marxism, economics, politics, society, education, culture, different forms of democracy, and international relations in the Asian Century. With an eye on past and present, the conference will also examine possible future developments. It will be undertaken in a supportive environment, seeking insight, understanding and constructive criticism.

The conference will involve keynote speakers and delegates from China and around the world giving panel and paper presentations.

DELEGATES FROM CHINA

The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences will send a significant number of leading Chinese scholars to participate in the conference. These scholars will be chosen on the basis of a nationwide search.

PANEL AND PAPER PROPOSALS

Panel proposals should include a panel title, rationale, list of presenters (up to four), abstracts for each presentation.

Paper proposals should include a title, abstract of up to 200 words, name of presenter and location.

NOTE: all paper and panel proposals must be sent to chinaroad2016@newcastle.edu.au by 15 May 2016.

Participants whose proposals are accepted will be required to register at the time for the conference.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

PROFESSOR COLIN MACKERRAS, GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY, PRESIDENT OF THE CHINESE STUDIES ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALIA

Professor Colin Mackerras has over 50 years of extensive experience in China and is a recognised expert on China-related studies, particularly Chinese drama, national minorities, Australian-Chinese relations and images of China in the West.

His keynote address is entitled: ‘China, Central Asia and the Economic Belt.’

ColinMackerras

 

The full website for the China Road conference is now up, with the deadline for panel and paper proposals on 1 May, 2016. See the website for registration, travel and accommodation suggestions.

chinaroadbanner_v2a (640x279)

The China Road conference is sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the University of Newcastle, Australia.

When 13 to 15 August 2016

Where Noah’s on the Beach Hotel, Cnr Shortland Esplanade & Zaara Street, Newcastle, NSW, Australia

Contact chinaroad2016@newcastle.edu.au

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline: panel and paper proposals for The China Road international conference due 1 May 2016.

We invite paper and panel proposals for the first China Road international conference in the Southern Hemisphere.

The China Road has a number of levels of meaning. It concerns China’s distinct path in the modern world, a path that has also been called the ‘Beijing Consensus’ and ‘socialism with Chinese characteristics’, with deep historical roots and a broad basis in reality. It also refers to the new ‘Belt and Road Initiative’, which seeks to revitalise countries along and around the old Silk Road – a revitalisation that includes economic, cultural, social and educational dimensions. These levels of meaning continue to generate significant debate and discussion: is China’s path distinct? If so, what are the features of this path? What role does China’s distant and recent history play in such a path?

In this light, the conference will examine the China Road from a range of perspectives. These include philosophy, Marxism, economics, politics, society, education, culture, different forms of democracy, and international relations in the Asian Century. With an eye on past and present, the conference will also examine possible future developments. It will be undertaken in a supportive environment, seeking insight, understanding and constructive criticism.

The conference will involve keynote speakers and delegates from China and around the world giving panel and paper presentations.

DELEGATES FROM CHINA

The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences will send a significant number of leading Chinese scholars to participate in the conference. These scholars will be chosen on the basis of a nationwide search.

PANEL AND PAPER PROPOSALS

Panel proposals should include a panel title, rationale, list of presenters (up to four), abstracts for each presentation.

Paper proposals should include a title, abstract of up to 200 words, name of presenter and location.

NOTE: the deadline for panel and paper proposals is 1 May 2016.

Participants whose proposals are accepted will be required to register at the time for the conference.

Power/Religion: A Revanche of Reaction or a Metaphor of Revolution?

Venues: Helsinki (University of Helsinki) and St Petersburg (European University at St Petersburg and Russian Christian Academy for Humanities)

Date: September 10–15, 2013

After a short-lived belief in the secularization of societies, religion has returned to the political arena with a vengeance. It is one of the most controversial but also determining political issues in today’s world. But is religion a reactionary force or does it involve revolutionary potentiality? This three-day international conference addresses questions pertaining to the relationship between power, politics, and religion.

Schedule

Tuesday September 10

Arrival at Helsinki

19:00 Dinner

Wednesday September 11

Venue: Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki (Address: Fabianinkatu 24)

10:00 Opening words

10:15 – 10:45 Roland Boer (University of Newcastle), “Translating Religion and Politics: An Alternative Model.”

10:45 – 11:15 Niko Huttunen (University of Helsinki), “How Fantasy Becomes True: Paul between Political Realism and Eschatological Fantasy.”

11:15 – 11:45 Sergei Prozorov (University of Helsinki), “Pussy Riot and the Politics of Profanation.”

11:45 – 13:15 Lunch

13:15 – 13:45 Chin Ken Pa (Chung Yuan Christian University), “W. T. Chu’s Jesus the Proletarian.”

13:45 – 14:15 Olli-Pekka Moisio (University of Jyväskylä), “Max Horkheimer on Religion as a Resistance and Hope.”

14:15 – 14:45 Sergey Kozin (Russian Christian Academy for Humanities), TBA

Coffee break

15:15 – 15:45 Sanna Tirkkonen (University of Helsinki), “Power, Religion and Justice: Foucault on the Cult of Dionysus.”

15:15 – 15:45 Lars T. Lih (McGill University) “Shield of Aeneas: Ancient and Modern Narratives of World-historical Mission.”

15:45 – 16:15 Philip Chia (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) “Occupy Central: Scribal Resistance in Daniel, the Long Road to Universal Suffrage”

Discussion

19:00 Departure from Helsinki (Ferry to St Petersburg)

Thursday September 12

9:30: Arrival at St Petersburg

Venue: European University at St Petersburg (Address: #3 Gagarinskaya Street)

14:00 Opening words

14:15 – 14:45 Joseph Bartlett (Indiana University), “Extremism for Love: Horkheimer beyond the Age of Islamic Terror.”

14:45 – 15:15 Ali Al-Hakim (International Islamic Contemporary Thought Foundation), “Shi’ah’s Standpoint between Revolutionaries and Quietists.”

15:15 – 15:45 Jouni Tilli (University of Jyväskylä), “’We should obey the nation state and God rather than men’: Lutheran Metanoia and the Politics of Obedience.”

Coffee break

16:15 – 16:45 Youzhuang Geng (Renmin University of China), “The Rhetoric of Icons: from Image to Voice.”

16:45 – 17:15 Mika Ojakangas (University of Jyväskylä), “From Political Theology to Theological Politics.”

17:15 – 17:45 Markku Koivusalo (University of Helsinki), “The Theological Structure of the 20th Century Extreme Political Thought”

17:45 – 18:00 Discussion

19:00 Dinner

Friday September 13

Venue: TBA

11:00 – 11:30 Christina Petterson (Humboldt University of Berlin), “’Der Mensch muß immer im Streit seÿn’: Zinzendorf and the ideology of Language.”

11:30 – 12:00 Elisa Heinämäki (University of Helsinki), “What is Radical about Radical Pietism?”

12:00 – 12:30 Artemy Magun (European University, St Petersburg), TBA

12:30 – 12:45 Discussion

12:45 – 14:00 Lunch

14:00 – 17:30 special section for additional Russian participants (in Russian)

19:00 Dinner

 

Saturday September 14

Sightseeing

20:00 Departure from St Petersburg (Ferry to Helsinki)

Sunday September 15

8:30 Return to Helsinki

 

Sponsors:

Subjectivity, Historicity, and Communality Research Group (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki)

Academy of Finland (Faculty of Theology, University of Helsinki and the Department of Social Sciences and Philosophy, University of Jyväskylä)

European University at St Petersburg (http://www.eu.spb.ru/)

Russian Christian Academy for Humanities (http://rhga.ru/)

Religion and Political Thought Project

Australian Research Council

Last weekend’s Religion and Radicalism conference was quite something. Under normal circumstances, it requires a little more effort than usual to get here – to Herrnhut, Saxony. On this occasion, the effort was significant. For those who evaded Malaysian elections, slashed feet, dreadful German immigration officials, lambing season and so on, the day of travel revealed … a Lufthansa strike. From Kiev to Oslo, from Helsinki to London, people scrambled to find other options. Eventually, people managed to get here over the next day. The result was that once here the appreciation was much higher.

The paper sessions were absorbing, generating new ideas and at times vigorous debate:

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In the evenings we gathered in our apartment for drinks (the amusement was largely due to this map) …

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… and took instructions in yoga:

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Amazing what a few drinks will make people do at 1.00 am:

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Even so, ageing bones make the lotus position just a little more difficult:

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On Sunday afternoon we had a special treat: the wind chill knocked what was already the coldest ‘spring’ day on record to -20 Centigrade:

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It was our day for trekking, exploring the early days of the Moravian Brethren, Zinzendorf’s Schloss, and the stone circles used for quiet gatherings in the forest. The circles were used to meet and discuss community problems in the 1700s:

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With weather like this, I’m guessing not many problems would have been that urgent. Meanwhile, we made the most of it and plunged down steep hillsides:

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On return, there was nothing a little bit of thawing wouldn’t restore to its old self.

Yet, despite it’s apparent remoteness …

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… it is a place to which people seem to come from all corners of the globe. They even had flags out for us:

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Or, more closely:

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Second Call for Papers

Power/Religion: A Revanche of Reaction or a Metaphor of Revolution?

Venues: Helsinki (University of Helsinki)

St Petersburg (European University at St Petersburg and Russian Christian Academy for Humanities)

Date: September 10–15, 2013

Paper proposals due May 1, 2013

After a short-lived belief in the secularization of societies, religion has returned to the political arena with a vengeance. It is one of the most controversial but also determining political issues in today’s world. The majority of contemporary wars and terrorist attacks are religiously laden. The age of theocracies is by no means over. European secular countries are trying to tackle with the issue of religious symbols in the public sphere. Religious words such as blasphemy have reappeared in political vocabulary. While the Lutheran State-Church is reduced to insignificance, in Orthodox countries the Church and the State have entered into a mutual partnership legitimizing each other’s power claims against secular reformists. Overtly secular intellectuals in the West have turned to religious discourses in their quest for tools of cultural and political criticism in order to fight capitalism and neoliberal hegemony. Not Marx or Lenin but the Apostle Paul and Thomas Müntzer are leading revolutionary figures today.

But is religion a reactionary force or does it involve revolutionary potentiality? Or is religion, particularly the Abrahamic religions, fundamentally twofold, originally based on a revolutionary event but developed into a power system of the Church. Or is the very power of the Church based on the fidelity to the revolutionary event in its origin? What about religious doctrines? In the Epistle to the Romans, the Apostle Paul proclaims that every person should be subject to the governing authorities (Romans 13), while in the same letter he observes that we are “not under law but under grace” (Romans 6:14). Further, in Acts 5:29 we may read the Apostles’ collective reply to the high priest who charged them not to preach in the name of Christ: “We must obey God rather than men.” Indeed, does not religion open up a transcendent dimension of freedom within the immanence of political order? Or is it precisely this transcendent dimension of freedom – but also that of secrecy (arcana) – that is needed in order to legitimize clerical and political power? Presumably, there is no definitive answer to these questions, for it is quite obvious that we have to take into account historical contexts: it is probable that same religious principles that empower revolutionary militants can be used by the established Churches in order to suppress them. Or is it? This two-day conference addresses these and related questions. Papers may deal with perennial, historical or contemporary issues. Both theoretical and empirical approaches are welcome.

Schedule

Tuesday September 10

Arrival at Helsinki

19:00 Get together party / dinner

Wednesday September 11

Venue: Collegium for Advanced Studies (University of Helsinki)

9:15 – 11:45 five papers

11:45 – 13:15 lunch

13:15 – 15:45 five papers

19:00 Departure from Helsinki (Ferry to St Petersburg)

Thursday September 12

9:30: Arrival at St Petersburg

14:00 – 17:30 five papers

19:00 Dinner

Friday September 13

10:00 – 12:30 five papers

12:30 Lunch

14:00 – 17:30 special section for additional Russian participants (in Russian)

19:00 Dinner

Saturday September 14

Sightseeing

20:00 Departure from St Petersburg (Ferry to Helsinki)

Sunday September 15

8:30 Return to Helsinki

Paper Proposals

Researchers interested in presenting a paper at the conference are asked to send an abstract of no more than 300 words by the 1st of May 2013 to the following email addresses:

mika.ojakangas@jyu.fi

power.religion2013@gmail.com

NOTE: The conference will take place in Helsinki and St Petersburg. Those participants who wish to participate in the sessions in both cities are recommended to use the opportunity to purchase a visa free cruise / hotel package to St Petersburg including two nights on board (St Peter Line / Princess Maria, Helsinki – St Petersburg – Helsinki) and two nights’ accommodation in a hotel (four stars) in St Petersburg. The price of the cruise / hotel package is about 250-300€. If you are interested in the package, please contact Mika Ojakangas (mika.ojakangas@jyu.fi) before the 1st of April.

Looking forward to receiving your paper proposals,

Roland Boer (University of Newcastle, Australia)

Sergey Kozin (Russian Christian Academy of the Humanities)

Mika Ojakangas (University of Jyväskylä, Finland)

Sponsors:

Subjectivity, Historicity, and Communality Research Group (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki)

Academy of Finland (Faculty of Theology, University of Helsinki)

European University at St Petersburg

Russian Christian Academy for Humanities

Religion and Political Thought Project (Australian Research Council)

Preliminary Call for Papers.

Power/Religion: A Revanche of Reaction or a Metaphor of Revolution?

Venues: University of Helsinki and the European University at St Petersburg

Date: 10-15 September, 2013

After a short-lived belief in the secularization of societies, religion has returned to the political arena with a vengeance. It is one of the most controversial but also determining political issues in today’s world. The majority of contemporary wars and terrorist attacks are religiously laden. The age of theocracies is by no means over. European secular countries are trying to tackle with the issue of religious symbols in the public sphere. Religious words such as blasphemy have reappeared in political vocabulary. While the Lutheran State-Church is reduced to insignificance, in Orthodox countries the Church and the State have entered into a mutual partnership legitimizing each other’s power claims against secular reformists. Overtly secular intellectuals in the West have turned to religious discourses in their quest for tools of cultural and political criticism in order to fight capitalism and neoliberal hegemony. Not Marx or Lenin but the Apostle Paul and Thomas Müntzer are leading revolutionary figures today.

But is religion a reactionary force or does it involve revolutionary potentiality? Or is religion, particularly the Abrahamic religions, fundamentally twofold, originally based on a revolutionary event but developed into a power system of the Church. Or is the very power of the Church based on the fidelity to the revolutionary event in its origin? What about religious doctrines? In the Epistle to the Romans, the Apostle Paul proclaims that every person should be subject to the governing authorities (Romans 13), while in the same letter he observes that we are “not under law but under grace” (Romans 6:14). Further, in Acts 5:29 we may read the Apostles’ collective reply to the high priest who charged them not to preach in the name of Christ: “We must obey God rather than men.” Indeed, does not religion open up a transcendent dimension of freedom within the immanence of political order? Or is it precisely this transcendent dimension of freedom – but also that of secrecy (arcana) – that is needed in order to legitimize clerical and political power? Presumably, there is no definitive answer to these questions, for it is quite obvious that we have to take into account historical contexts: it is probable that same religious principles that empower revolutionary militants can be used by the established Churches in order to suppress them. Or is it? This two-day conference addresses these and related questions. Papers may deal with perennial, historical or contemporary issues. Both theoretical and empirical approaches are welcome.

Organizers:

Mika Ojakangas, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Artemy Magun, European University at St. Petersburg, Russian Federation

Sergey Kozin, University of Newcastle, Australia

Roland Boer, University of Newcastle, Australia

Please send paper proposals to me at this stage.

This is the fifth conference to be held under the ‘Religion and Radicalism’ series. To date, we have had:

Copenhagen: September 2010

Taipei: September 2011

Newcastle: October 2012

Herrnhut: March 2013

A five-volume series, under the title of Religion and Radicalism, will gather the articles from this international series of conferences.